Recommended Products

Recommended-Products
The E-MU 0404 is a Great starter USB interface. It has 2 XLR / 1/4 Inch combo jacks, Midi in/out. So you will have the ability to record 2 inputs plus a midi keyboard at the same time right out of the box. It has been well recieved among the Reaper community. I personally do not own one but from everything I have heard its an AWESOME starter.
Headphones are very important during recording as well as during mixing(for critical listening)… I prefer the Sennheiser HD280s for most applications during tracking. They have excellent attenuation to block out the surrounding noise i.e. drummers. They are a little hot around 10k but you may like that(i do). All in all a great pair of headphones.
The Sony MDR 7506s are known to be very flat with their frequency response and in turn have become the industry standard studio headphones. I have used these for live applications to mix shows in an offsite location, as well as using them in the studio for reference mixing. I would recommend these to anyone with any level of studio ability.
My personal preference for studio monitors would have to be the original Yamaha NS10s for critical mixing… But since those aren’t available anymore your next best bet is to get a pair of Yamaha HS80s, which can be made to sound like NS 10s… or a hi-fi studio monitor(like Genelecs). I would not be surprised if these became the new industry standard reference monitors.
The Behringer Truth 2031As are what I’m currently mixing with right now and I’ve had GREAT results… I have seen mixed reviews on them for certain things blowing out, but if you don’t mix on them at 110db I don’t think you will have that issue. Plus, your mixes will translate very well to other systems(which is the most important thing).
The PS01 is a mic pop-filter. A necessity for any studio. If you don’t currently use one I would highly recommend picking this up. I can’t imagine how many extra hours i would spend tracking if this wasn’t on every vocal mic setup I use.
The AKG 414 is an awesome all around condenser Mic. It’s in the upper price range for some small studios but it has produced great results. It accents around 4-6khz just a touch, but otherwise very transparent, to make running this mic with a flat EQ easy to feel like you have a final product on vocals. Other applications would be as an over head or room mic on drums, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, acoustic piano, wind instruments, etc. It picks up a “what your ears WANT to hear” kind of sound.
This is my GO TO kick drum Mic. This sucker sounds amazing, very full bodied and very rugged. It also sounds VERY good on thin vocalists since it’s a wide diaphragm dynamic mic.
I recently mixed a track for a client with this mic being used and I was blown away. It was micing an acoustic guitar along with a Neumann TLM 103 (over $1k)and I couldn’t decide which mic i liked better because they both sounded so good.
Sennheiser e604s are great mics for live and studio applications for drum toms, maybe a snare, maybe a guitar amp, maybe a bass amp… But designed for toms with their awesome claw mounting system.
Shure 57s are a must have! I don’t care what level of ability you have, if you don’t have an SM57 you need one. These are the standard for snare drums, toms, guitar amps, bass amps, acoustic guitars, and maybe even a very aggressive vocalist.
A pair of Shure KSM 141 can’t do a studio any wrong. Amazing for acoustics guitar applications, group vocal recording(X-pattern or Omni), over head or room drum mics and much more. A little on the pricey side for a project studio, but well worth it if you have the cash.

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